ANTHIMOS THE PELOPONNESIAN Antimension: Epitaph 1837 - x +
AntP1837epit


CN: AntP1837epit

MT: copper engraving on linen (45x59)

TX: printed in Greek <THE PRESENT ICON WAS ENGRAVED BY ANTHIMOS PELOPONESIOS TO THE BENEFIT OF THE CHRISTOPHILES 1837 DECEMBER KE>, embroidered <OF GABRIE[L]>, embroidered in square formation <J/CR/TRIUMPHS> <C/XR/NIKA> / <LEFAKI>

CM: This antimension is a print on linen is printed by a finely engraved copperplate. The development of printing made it possible to reproduce and decorate antimensia quickly and easily, using the copperplate method. By the last quarter of the eighteenth century Mount Athos had acquired a leading role as a centre for engraving and producing religious prints. We know the names of many of the engravers, both monks and laymen, who set up on the Holy Mountain the workshops from which issued whole series of antimensia; thus they developed, over the years, the familiar 'Hagioritic type' of decoration for this liturgical vestment which, as represented by the bronzeplate made by the engraver hieromonk Ignatios (1842), constitutes a special group within the third period.

The principal characteristic of the so-called 'Hagioritic type' of antimension is the iconographic innovation of adding a series of small icons with liturgical and festal themes and scenes from the Life of Christ as a frame around the central theme of the Lamentation, now substantially confined to the centre. This iconographic version, considered to be the creation of the monk Theophilos of Corfu (1826), was copied on virtually all subsequent Athonite antimensia produced by the engravers Daniel (1836), Anthimos the Peloponnesian (1837, 1847) and Ioannis Kaldis (1869, 1870, 1878), as well as by Ignatios (1842). The iconographic type represented by this print continued to be used for antimensia until the middle of the twentieth century.

[Megakles 05/2005]

DN: Dr. John S. Bailey - 2004

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