CHARLET & JACOTIN Portrait of Marie Antoinette (1755-1793) ca. 1860 [R/V] - x +
ChJa1860mari


CN: ChJa1860mari

MT: albumen print on paper mounted on card (9x5 / C:11x6)

TX: embossed at lower right of picture <C.J>, printed at lower left of margin in English <CHARLET & JACOTIN>, inscribed with fountain pen at lower center of margin <Marie Antoinette>, inscribed with pencil at rear upper center <Marie Antoinette>, printed at upper center <PHOTOGRAPHIE / CHARLET & JACOTIN / 37, Boult. de Strasbourg / PARIS.>, stamped below <MAISON / ALPH GIROUX>

PR: Maison Alphonse Giroux, Paris

DN: Mr. Megakles Rogakos - 2009

CM: Maria Antonia Josepha Johanna von Habsburg-Lothringen, Marie Antoinette Josèphe Jeanne de Habsbourg-Lorraine in French, (Vienna, 2 November 1755 - Paris, 16 October 1793) was an Archduchess of Austria and the Queen of France and Navarre. She was the fifteenth and penultimate child of Empress Maria Theresa and Emperor Francis I. § At the age of fourteen, on the day of her marriage to Louis-Auguste, Dauphin of France, she became Dauphine de France. At the death of King Louis XV, in May 1774, her husband ascended the French throne as Louis XVI, and Marie Antoinette assumed the title of Queen of France and Navarre. After seven years of marriage she gave birth to a daughter, Marie-Thérèse-Charlotte, the first of their four children. § During the Reign of Terror, at the height of the French Revolution, Marie Antoinette's husband was deposed and the royal family was imprisoned. Marie Antoinette was tried, convicted of treason and executed by guillotine on 16 October 1793, nine months after her husband. § In popular culture, the phrase "Let them eat cake" is often attributed to Marie Antoinette. However, there is no evidence to support that she ever uttered this phrase, and it is now generally regarded as a "journalistic cliché"[89] which first appeared in The Confessions of Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Rousseau wrote the following in Book 6 (1736): "Enfin je me rappelai le pis-aller d'une grande princesse à qui l'on disait que les paysans n'avaient pas de pain, et qui répondit : Qu'ils mangent de la brioche. J'achetai de la brioche." (Finally I recalled the worst-recourse of a great princess to whom one said that the peasants had no bread, and who responded: "Let them eat brioche...). Rousseau does not name the "great princess", and it must be noted that he was an eighteenth-century philosophe and fiction writer, not an historian. [Megakles Rogakos 12/2009]

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